October 12, 2016 Martine's Wines

An article from Wine Spectator published November 15, 2016 Lalou Bize-Leroy is recognized as one of Wine Spectator’s “luminaries who made a difference” in the magazine’s 40th Anniversary issue. In 1955, Henri Leroy installed his 23-year-old daughter Marcelle, known as Lalou, at the head of the family’s Burgundy négociant, Maison Leroy. The move allowed him to focus on other, more lucrative parts of the family business, mainly a brandy distillery. Not surprisingly, men in 1950s Burgundy were not keen on taking orders from a young woman. Bize-Leroy was unfazed. Throughout her career, this intelligent woman has been successful by developing strong principles and sticking to…

June 30, 2015 Martine's Wines

An article by Bruce Sanderson from the June 30, 2015 issue of Wine Spectator. Isolated but undaunted, Lalou Bize-Leroy makes some of Burgundy’s finest wines Disaster loomed in Burgundy’s 1993 vintage. A wet spring led to severe attacks of mildew. To save their grape crops, growers had to spray twice as much fungicide as in a normal year. Marcelle (“Lalou”) Bize-Leroy would have none of that. The owner of Domaine Leroy, with holdings in many of Burgundy’s finest vineyards, she had been committed to biodynamic principles since founding the estate in 1988. She adamantly refused the use of chemicals, even…

September 15, 2004 Martine

At the end of August, the outlook was grim. Following the flowering, the cool nights of June led to oidium (powdery mildew). July was wet. August was overcast and cool, which meant no luminosity—so necessary for the ripening of the grapes. Then, two major hail storms unfurled over Pommard and Volnay, all the way to Marsannay devastating vineyards and causing 10% to 80% damage to the vines. On the positive side, the wet winter that followed the severe draught of the Summer of 2003, revived the severely damaged but shallow-rooted younger vines. It seemed to be a promising normal crop…

October 1, 2003 Martine

I arrived in Mâcon on August 25th, anticipating that the harvest would start on September 1st –already at least two to three weeks earlier than customary.  The hot weather began in mid-June and was still in the mid-nineties when I arrived. There were no green meadows on the Beaujolais and Mâconnais hillsides, just burnt trees here and there.  Only the vineyards painted striking green patches in the California-like landscape! As you know, vines have deep roots. The older the vine, the longer the roots, sometimes reaching up to 50 feet, allowing them to get nutrients and water. [caption id=”attachment_1773″ align=”alignright”…